Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Resources for Summer Learning


Fun Ideas This Summer--for Teens





Summer Bump Not Slump: Midsummer Shakespeare Festival At Your House



Summer Bump Not Slump: READ! READ! READ!



Summer Bump Not Slump: Everyday Science at Home



Mom, I'm Bored--What Can I Do?



Summer Activities: Art



Well Rounded Summer Resources: Reading, Art, STEM, Nature



Summer Bump Not Slump: For Budding Environmental Scientists





White Fang by Jack London: Great Summer Read



Summer Activity: Thunderstorm? Read This Story





Summer Bump Not Slump: Women's History-Is There Much?



Summer Bump Not Slump: Online Resources for Readers







Summer Activity: Go Outside!



Kids' Activities For Summer (Warning: Its Gonna Be Wet)




Summer Bump Not Slump: A Variety of Resources





Summer Activity: How Does Your Garden Taste?



Summer Activities for Kids and Parents



Summer Bump Not Slump: Stuff To Do



Summer Activity: Can You Swim?




Saturday, April 13, 2019

Poem In Your Pocket Day-April 18


National Poem in Your Pocket Day 

http://www.poets.org/academy-american-poets/programs/national-poem-your-pocket-day 

About PIYP Day 
http://www.nyc.gov/html/poem/html/about/about.shtml

Poem in Your Pocket Day

https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/poem-in-your-pocket-day/ 

Participate in Poem in Your Pocket Day!

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/calendar-activities/participate-poem-your-pocket-20720.html 






Such a difficult choice-which poem? "The Raven"? "The Road Not Taken"? "Hope Is A Thing With Feathers"? I'm torn between a poem previously in my pocket-"The Rainy Day" by Longfellow- and tucking e e cummings' "anyone lived in a pretty how town"  back there. Hey, since there is no rule about only one poem in one pocket, maybe I'll put on my cargo pants and live it up!

Friday, April 12, 2019

What Does Poetry Do?


Poetry brings us immediately to the top of Bloom's Taxonomy of higher level thinking, triggering the growth of synapses in our brains as we struggle for personal meaning in the verse. Poetry satisfies our daily emotional nutritional requirements for serendipity, musical language, inspiration, mental challenge, comfort, schmaltz, and frequently, humor. Poetry is packaged in mystery, mathematical meter, and personal validation--equity in our own interpretations.

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Matisse and Spring--What's Outside Your Window?

The Dessert: Harmony in Red, Henri Matisse http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dessert:_Harmony_in_Red_%28The_Red_Room%29

Looks like Henri had trees in bloom outside his window.
Maybe he was listening to this music while he painted, which premiered the same year, 1908.

Maurice Ravel - Rhapsodie Espagnole, I-II 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1ZyAf1udmU 

National Poetry Month: Poem #8


i carry your heart with me  

by E. E. Cummings
i carry your heart with me(i carry it in
my heart)i am never without it(anywhere
i go you go,my dear; and whatever is done
by only me is your doing,my darling)
i fear
no fate(for you are my fate,my sweet)i want
no world(for beautiful you are my world,my true)
and it's you are whatever a moon has always meant
and whatever a sun will always sing is you

here is the deepest secret nobody knows
(here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud
and the sky of the sky of a tree called life;which grows
higher than the soul can hope or mind can hide)
and this is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart

i carry your heart(i carry it in my heart) 

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

National Poetry Month: Poem #7

  “Hope” is the thing with feathers - (314)

By Emily Dickinson



“Hope” is the thing with feathers -

That perches in the soul -

And sings the tune without the words -

And never stops - at all -

And sweetest - in the Gale - is heard -

And sore must be the storm -

That could abash the little Bird

That kept so many warm -

I’ve heard it in the chillest land -

And on the strangest Sea -

Yet - never - in Extremity,

It asked a crumb - of me.

This is such a precious metaphor. Thank you, Emily.

Emily Dickinson 1830–1886

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

National Poetry Month: Poem #6

Diverging roads.

The Road Not Taken

By Robert Frost
Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost
 Robert Frost 

Monday, April 1, 2019

National Poetry Month: Whoa, Dude!


Would be a 'whoa, dude!' experience

That's awesome! Not exactly what Wordsworth said, but almost. This is a very famous poem with lots of mixed metaphors, but still great for this time of year with all the tulips and daffodils popping up.

The serendipity (happy surprise) expressed in this poem is like the opposite of PTSD--the memory of the experience brings refreshing joy and satisfying peace, as experiences in nature often do.

  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Wandered_Lonely_as_a_Cloud
The theme of feeling a part of nature and having joy in reflecting back on a beautiful experience is worth reading this poem with kids. Plus, they will meet 'I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud'  many times in English literature class. I do like the daffodils dancing spritely. Personification does it for me every time.

in Just
by e e cumming

http://www.poetry-archive.com/c/in_just.html
Springtime is an excellent time for teaching poetry because it seems poets get very inspired during this season. e. e. cummings even made up new words for spring--mudluscious (You can hear your galoshes go schluppp as you try to extract them out of the newly melted snow/mud. Like hot fudge being pulled out of a sundae. That's mudluscious.) And everyone knows what puddlewonderful is; none of us resist splashing in a puddle. Of course, we in SoCal can't fully appreciate the ecstacy that the folks Back East experience having a puddle to splash after everything freezes for half the year--but we sort of empathize.
That's not eddieandbill or bettyandisbel. Maybe its bettyandeddie or isbelandbill; or bettyandbill or isbelandeddie.


 Kids also love music. So it is no surprise that Spring from Vivaldi would really tickle them with the marvelous sounds of a  spring day--that they can identify on their walk to and from school. The music even sounds like flowers burst-blooming in the sun.


Spring by Vivaldi
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRxofEmo3HA
Performed by the Budapest Strings.

National Poetry Month: Poems # 4 and #5




Harlem

By Langston Hughes
What happens to a dream deferred?



      Does it dry up

      like a raisin in the sun?

      Or fester like a sore—

      And then run?

      Does it stink like rotten meat?

      Or crust and sugar over—

      like a syrupy sweet?



      Maybe it just sags

      like a heavy load.



      Or does it explode?

 
Mother to Son
By Langston Hughes
Well, son, I’ll tell you:
Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.
It’s had tacks in it,
And splinters,
And boards torn up,
And places with no carpet on the floor—
Bare.
But all the time
I’se been a-climbin’ on,
And reachin’ landin’s,
And turnin’ corners,
And sometimes goin’ in the dark
Where there ain’t been no light.
So boy, don’t you turn back.
Don’t you set down on the steps
’Cause you finds it’s kinder hard.
Don’t you fall now—
For I’se still goin’, honey,
I’se still climbin’,
And life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.

Sunday, March 31, 2019

National Poetry Month: Poem #3

Photo by Shane, Wargave, England


 Summer Song



Wanderer moon
smiling a
faintly ironical smile
at this
brilliant, dew-moistened
summer morning,–
a detached
sleepily indifferent
smile, a
wanderer’s smile,–
if I should
buy a shirt
your color and
put on a necktie
sky-blue
where would they carry me?

- William Carlos Williams

National Poetry Month: Poem #2

The Fall of Icarus by Bruehgal
Landscape with the Fall of Icarus
William Carlos Williams 

According to Brueghel
when Icarus fell
it was spring 
a farmer was ploughing
his field
the whole pageantry 

of the year was
awake tingling
with itself 

sweating in the sun
that melted
the wings' wax 

unsignificantly
off the coast
there was 

a splash quite unnoticed
this was
Icarus drowning 

 William Carlos Williams

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Carlos_Williams

Icarus

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icarus

Jim Henson's The Storyteller Daedalus and Icarus

 http://www.tv.com/shows/jim-hensons-the-storyteller/daedalus-and-icarus-1598028/

  

Friday, March 29, 2019

National Poetry Month: Poem #1

 
The Curious Blackbird by Maureen Ida Farley

Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird

Wallace Stevens


I
Among twenty snowy mountains,
The only moving thing
Was the eye of the blackbird.
II
I was of three minds,
Like a tree
In which there are three blackbirds.
III
The blackbird whirled in the autumn winds.
It was a small part of the pantomime.
IV
A man and a woman
Are one.
A man and a woman and a blackbird
Are one.
V
I do not know which to prefer,
The beauty of inflections
Or the beauty of innuendoes,
The blackbird whistling
Or just after.
VI
Icicles filled the long window
With barbaric glass.
The shadow of the blackbird
Crossed it, to and fro.
The mood
Traced in the shadow
An indecipherable cause.
VII
O thin men of Haddam,
Why do you imagine golden birds?
Do you not see how the blackbird
Walks around the feet
Of the women about you?
VIII
I know noble accents
And lucid, inescapable rhythms;
But I know, too,
That the blackbird is involved
In what I know.
IX
When the blackbird flew out of sight,
It marked the edge
Of one of many circles.
X
At the sight of blackbirds
Flying in a green light,
Even the bawds of euphony
Would cry out sharply.
XI
He rode over Connecticut
In a glass coach.
Once, a fear pierced him,
In that he mistook
The shadow of his equipage
For blackbirds.
XII
The river is moving.
The blackbird must be flying.
XIII
It was evening all afternoon.
It was snowing
And it was going to snow.
The blackbird sat
In the cedar-limbs.

The Beatles - Blackbird 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Kx4xVKo9z8

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Don't Like Poetry? Betcha Do

...don't forget all those Valentine's rhymes!

 You say you don't like poetry--I doubt that. We just have to establish what we mean by poetry.

Yes, you enjoyed a movie that is all poetry.
That come-on line is nothing but poetry.

Romeo + Juliet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romeo_%2B_Juliet 

 

The Cat in the Hat--even my name is poetry.

 

You can't say you never liked Dr. Seuss--what's that--you forgot it was poetry? 

The Cat in the Hat

http://www.seussville.com/books/book_detail.php?isbn=9780394800011 

     

Betting you have quoted poetry, though maybe not all at once.

Tis better to have loved and lost/Than never to have loved at all  Tennyson To err is human; to forgive, divine  Alexander Pope  A thing of beauty is a joy forever  Keats And miles to go before I sleep  Robert Frost Hope springs eternal in the human breast  Alexander Pope To be or not to be: that is the question Shakespeare I know why the caged bird sings Maya Angelou O Romeo, Romeo; wherefore art thou Romeo Shakespeare...there's no joy in Mudville, the mighty Casey has struck out. Thayer

You probably chuckled at the Limerick about the girl from Venus, but I won't print that since this is a family edublog. But this poem  might make you smile, especially noting the poet.

The marriage of poor Kim Kardashian
Was krushed like a kar in a krashian.
Her Kris kried, "Not fair!
Why kan't I keep my share?" 
But Kardashian fell klean outa fashian.
—Salman Rushdie 

Maybe you didn't realize you were accessing poetry during spiritual moments. The Psalms are poems, like the most quoted Psalm 23.
Lena Moore Psalm 23 Quilt ca. 1930 Collection of Janet M. Green "Talking Quilts" American Folk Art Museum
Remember when you were in ninth grade and you kind of liked that wild story with the Greek guy and all the monsters like the Cyclops and the crazy-haired Medusa? 

That was poetry, thanks to Homer, not Simpson. The Odyssey by Homer.
Cyclops AKA Claymation

Achilles AKA Brad Pitt.

 And don't forget Achilles, not the heel. The Illiad (and the story of Troy) was a poem, too.



 Speaking of Homer Simpson, here is my last evidentiary item. You enjoyed "The Raven: the Simpson's Version." I know you did. Though they did a really Poe job of it. (Ha, English teacher joke.)

The Raven: The Simpsons Version

http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=251203 

Poetry...you like poetry. Told ya so.

The Raven:The Simpsons Version [117,615 views] 
the
The Raven:The Simpsons Version[117,615 views]